St. Johns Country Day School

Curriculum
St. Johns mission is to provide a superior college preparatory program with a diverse curriculum that stresses academic accomplishment, artistic expression, and athletic participation in a supportive family atmosphere that fosters self-reliance and ethical responsibility.

St. Johns offers a unified and integrated academic program that mindfully and cohesively spans a child’s school years from Pre-K through Upper School. It provides developmentally appropriate growth-enhancing challenges in a traditional, yet innovative, well-rounded curriculum engaging students in their time and place in the world. It is decidedly college-preparatory, emphasizing deep reading, critical thinking, effective writing, and problem-solving skills. Foreign languages, visual and performing arts, and physical education are part of the curriculum at every grade level. State-of-the-art resources, integrated into their lessons by our savvy Apple Vanguard certified teachers, results in students who are adept and creative with the power of technology. St. Johns is committed to empowering our students with the skills and sense of responsibility to make positive contributions with their life, and this is woven into the curriculum.

The St. Johns academic program is mission-driven and passionately pursued by highly skilled faculty who design their courses to be responsive to their students’ needs and the world in which they live. A full-time director of curriculum and instruction provides leadership and oversight to ensure its continuity and effectiveness. Having our PreK-3s through high school students on the same campus organically facilitates this. The ongoing collaboration among highly-qualified colleagues who have taught, are teaching, or will teach their students fuels the sense in every teacher that they are invested in the long-range success of each child. This is reflected in the design of every unit and every lesson. It is celebrated in the participation of the full faculty at graduation.

The St. Johns graduate is prepared to thrive in college and life, as citizens of the world doing work that matters.

Lower School Curriculum

The three-year-old program at St. Johns Country Day School is dedicated to the philosophy that young children grow and develop in a sequential manner with predictable stages of development. It is the intention of this program to nurture and develop the physical, emotional, social, and cognitive growth of the individual child.

The three-year-old program at St. Johns Country Day School promotes developmentally appropriate learning opportunities through a variety of experiences. Socialization is fostered in a setting where positive interactions are modeled and encouraged. Caring, professional staff and a bright and inviting classroom provide children with a comforting and exciting educational environment.

The program shall provide each child with age appropriate experiences which encourage

  • Positive self-image
  • Appropriate social interaction
  • Creative expression
  • Development of large and small motor skills
  • Intellectual and academic growth

The program schedule will provide a flexible balance of

  • Active and quiet activities
  • Individual and group activities
  • Indoor and outdoor activities

Reading Readiness

  • Children will learn to speak and express ideas in a social group through retelling stories, role playing, and creative play.
  • Children will learn to follow two step directions.
  • Children will develop a love for books.
  • Children will strengthen eye-hand coordination.
  • Children will recognize and write first name.
  • Children will recognize and write letters.
  • Children will learn letter sounds.

Math Readiness

  • Children will recognize and draw shapes.
  • Children will classify objects into categories.
  • Children will rote count and write to 10.
  • Children will be familiar with the calendar.
  • Children will understand concepts such as in/out, big/small, and over/under.
  • Children will acquire number sense.

Science

  • Children will learn about the world in which we live.
  • Children will learn about plants and animals.
  • Children will learn through doing.

Social Studies

  • Children will learn about communities.
  • Children will learn about holidays and traditions

Art

  • Children will cut and use scissors safely.
  • Children will create with crayons, markers, pencils, and watercolors.
  • Creativity will be stimulated through discovery.
  • Children will use clay and create ceramics.
  • Children will attend Art class twice a week.

Physical Activity

  • Children will be provided with much opportunity for play.
  • Large muscle development will be enhanced.
  • Manipulative skills will be developed.
  • Creative expression and social interaction will be encouraged.
  • Children will develop good sportsmanship.
  • Basic skills will be developed - jumping, running, hopping, skipping.
  • Children will attend Physical Education classes twice a week.

Music

  • Children will learn songs related to unit development.
  • Instruments will be introduced.
  • Children will play simple rhythm and movement games.
  • Children will move creatively to a variety of music genres.
  • Children will attend Music classes twice a week.

Library

  • Children will develop a love of books.
  • Children will listen to stories and participate in activities related to the stories.
  • Children will attend Library class once a week.

French

  • Children will become familiar with the French culture.
  • Children will learn very basic vocabulary.
  • Children will learn to count in French.
  • Children will attend French class once a week.

Visual Motor Skills

  • Children will learn to hold crayon/pencil correctly.
  • Children will learn to trace objects.
  • Children will learn to cut on lines (straight and curved).
  • Children will learn to lace and string objects.
  • Children will learn to copy shapes and symbols.

Social/Emotional Development

  • Children will learn to separate easily from parents.
  • Children will respect and cooperate with others.
  • Children will successfully enter a group.
  • Children will learn the importance of sharing.

Work Habits

  • Children will participate in group activities.
  • Children will demonstrate independence.
  • Children will exhibit problem-solving skills.

Self-help Skills

  • Children will use the bathroom independently.
  • Children will understand and follow classroom routines.

Pre-K3

Pre-K4

The Pre-K4 language arts curriculum is a multi-sensory, phonics based program where students develop manual dexterity, perceptual awareness, and other essential readiness skills. These skills include learning letter names, writing letters, learning the sounds that letters represent and the function letters serve when blended to form words. There is also an emphasis on the development of oral language.

The math curriculum is based upon a progression from concept building to knowledge of basic facts and culminates in application of appropriate problem solving strategies. Manipulatives are used extensively as the basis for building concepts. The areas covered are matching, shapes, counting and numbers, reading and writing numbers, number concepts, patterns, classifying and graphing, money, measuring, and addition and subtraction.

The three main areas of science - life, earth, and physical science are explored through applications and activities which extend the children's understanding of self, world, and environment. Some of the science topics are the human body, dinosaurs, planets, plants, health, animals, weather and seasons.

The social studies program is designed to introduce children to themselves and to help them understand how they fit into the world around them. The school wide character education program, field trips, classroom speakers, and the daily preschool community flag raising support the curriculum. Examples of areas covered are self-awareness, family, interpersonal relationships, American heroes, holiday customs, respect for our country, community helpers, and transportation.

Kindergarten

Through a multi sensory, phonics based program students develop manual dexterity, perceptional awareness and other essential readiness skills. The children review the letter names, how to write the letters, what sounds the letters represent, and the functions the letters serve as they are blended to form words. The students work to develop fluency and comprehension of the written word. The students also develop a sight word vocabulary of approximately 90 words.

The math curriculum is based upon a progression of concept building to knowledge of basic facts and culminates in application of appropriate problem solving strategies. Manipulatives are widely used in the math program. Units of study include, but are not limited to, sorting and classifying, patterns,number concepts to 30, time, measurement, money, addition, subtraction, geometry and fractions.

The three main areas of science-life, earth and physical science- are explored through applications and activities which extend the children's understanding of self, world, and environment. Units of study include plants, astronomy, birds, the human body, insects, mammals, dinosaurs, reptiles and volcanoes.

The social studies program is designed to introduce children to themselves and to help them understand how they fit into the world around them. Units of study include all about me, early settlers, presidents and monuments.

First Grade

The First Grade Language Arts program consists of spelling, phonics, reading, and English. The students are taught using varied learning modalities and resources at their individualized ability level. We focus our studies utilizing the Houghton-Mifflin series in conjunction with various chapter books and literacy centers.

The First Grade Math program uses a systematic, step-by-step approach to developing mathematics concepts and skills. The Math In Focus series focuses on problem solving and reasoning while providing students the opportunity to demonstrate their understanding through whole group instruction, hands-on manipulatives, and individualized activities.

The First Grade Science program provides students an array of opportunities to explore scientific thinking and the world around them. Units of study include plants, space, weather, environment and animal habitats. The Houghton-Mifflin series guides the science instruction and is supported by hands-on classroom activities.

First Grade Social Studies is a unit based learning environment that explores history, culture, and geography. It travels from ancient Egypt through modern day life in Mexico. The program extends out from the Pearson Learning Core Knowledge and includes supplemental materials, technology, and hands-on experiences.

Second Grade

Language Arts is composed of several interrelated areas: reading, spelling, phonics, and English. The Houghton Mifflin Series is used for reading and English instruction in the classroom and reading level appropriate novels are implemented to promote teacher-guided and independent reading.

The Mathematics program uses a variety of ways to teach, practice, and review concepts. Some of the concepts presented in the Math In Focus series include: numeration, operations, computation, data, money, measurement, time, geometry, fractions, and an introduction to multiplication.

Science uses a hands-on, exploratory approach so students are active participants in the instruction. The areas of study are: Germs and Healthy Habits, Sound and Light Energy, The Circulatory System, and Fossils and Dinosaurs.

The Social Studies program is supplemented with activities that explore our society, history and traditions. The following concepts are the focus of instruction: Geography of the Americas, The Civil War, Ancient China, and Ancient Greece.

Creative Writing focuses on developing independent writing skills through the use of proper grammar, punctuation, capitalization, and spelling.

Music, Art, French, Library, Drama, Movement and P.E. are resource classes attended by all students throughout the week.

Third Grade

The third grade Language Arts is composed of several interrelated areas: reading, spelling, English, writing, listening, and speaking. The Houghton-Mifflin Series is the foundation for our language arts curriculum. All students receive instruction in a variety of teaching situations such as direct instruction, literary circles, ad hoc groups, and novel readings.

The purpose of the third grade math curriculum is to let students explore and understand mathematical concepts. Different types of instruction are used including direct instruction, partner work, games, Smartboard lessons, and small group activities. Again, the Math In Focus series is used as a base for our math standards.

The third grade science curriculum is supplemented by Pearson Interactive. Instruction of our biological and physical world uses hands-on, exploratory approaches so students are active participants in instruction.

The third grade social studies program use activities that explore our society, history and traditions within it. The program is supplemented with Pearson Learning Core Knowledge textbook.

Fourth Grade

The Language Arts program in grade 4 is comprehensive and challenging. Students have a daily English class that includes a study of grammar, spelling, and the mechanics of writing. Students also have a daily reading class that incorporates the study of novels to foster fluency, comprehension, and a love of reading. The study of prefixes and suffixes strengthens vocabulary development.

In Science class we continue a spiraling curriculum that begins in the pre-school in order to expose students to a variety of topics. A hands-on approach, including laboratory activities, is used in the grade 4 science curriculum.

The curriculum for grade 4 Social Studies centers on the great state of Florida. We explore the rich history of our beautiful state and its early inhabitants. Students learn about the first European settlers to have set foot on our shores. In addition to studying Florida, we learn the states and capitals that make up this great land. We culminate our year with an overview of Feudal societies in the fascinating time period of the Middle Ages.

The goal of the grade 4 ability-grouped math program is for all students to develop a fundamental understanding of mathematics. The Singapore approach to instruction sequences concepts from concrete, to pictorial, to the more abstract. A variety of learning methods are used including the use of manipulatives and computer applications.

Fifth Grade

The literacy curriculum in grade five is rich in diversity and rigor. Students have a daily English class that includes grammar studies, spelling, and the mechanics of writing for a variety of purposes. Students also have a daily reading class that incorporates the use of advanced novel studies to foster fluency, comprehension, and enjoyment. An in-depth study of Greek and Latin root words strengthens vocabulary development. Using the creative elements of writing, fifth graders begin to write thesis statements, five-paragraph essays, and are engaged in daily writing activities that strengthen written and verbal communication skills.

Technology is recognized as a valuable learning tool across the curriculum, and students have daily teacher facilitated lessons utilizing iPads and digital projectors

In 5th Grade Science, we continue a spiraling curriculum that begins in Pre-Kindergarten in order to expose students to a variety of topics in life science, earth and space science, and physical science. We focus on earth's oceans, the nature of matter and energy, force and motion, and astronomy.

In Social Studies, we begin an intensive study of the beginning of American History. We begin with the heroic journey of the first settlers from England, continue with our fierce battle for independence from King George III, and then complete our studies with the amazing development of our first organized government. The last quarter is reserved for our world studies. We focus on the incredible inventions, extraordinary artwork, and the diverse learning that took place during the era of the Italian Renaissance.

The goal of the 5th grade ability- grouped math program is for all students to develop a strong fundamental understanding using a Singapore Math approach. This approach sequences concepts from concrete, to pictorial, to the more abstract. A variety of learning methods are presented which include the use of manipulatives, hands-on activities, computer applications and pictorial illustrations. The fundamental goal is student demonstration of problem solving and critical thinking skills necessary for everyday life.

Middle & Upper School Curriculum

Computer Science

Current offerings in the Computer Science Department are designed for those students who might pursue college level studies in technical fields such as computer science, mathematics, and any area of science. Many courses at the college level in these areas require some work in computers. At the introductory level, St. Johns offers courses for students who would like to explore the computer programming field. Additionally, credit is available to students who have technical expertise with equipment and just enjoy working with technology through the Computer Technology Intern offering. At the advanced level, St. Johns offers Advanced Placement Computer Science Level A course which covers topics typically seen in a first semester course at the college level.

COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY INTERN 1 (713)

GRADES 10-12, 1 CREDIT, ELECTIVE. PREREQUISITE: DEPARTMENT RECOMMENDATION REQUIRED AND APPROVAL BY TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT HEAD
The technology internship is designed to give students a solid foundation in problem resolution and a methodical approach to resolving a lot of the problems facing the IT specialist today. Through working closely with the instructor, students are afforded the opportunity to handle a wide range of problems varying in complexity, including installing software and upgrades, installing security patches, trouble-shooting end-user issues and installing hardware. The prerequisite for this course is a rudimentary working knowledge and familiarity with both the Macintosh and PC platforms. Students should also have excellent people skills, since they will have to interact with the faculty and staff on a daily basis. Also, students should have the ability to work independently, as they will be sent out into the field in order to do campus-wide deployments of software – projects that typically take extended periods of time. Computer Technology Intern may be taken for more than one year: Computer Technology Intern 2 (716).

COMPUTER PROGRAMMING 1 (707)

BLENDED COURSE (ONLINE AND SOME TRADITIONAL CLASS) GRADES 9-12, 1 SEMESTER, ½ CREDIT, ELECTIVE

Computer Programming 1 is a one-semester introduction to basic programming concepts, design techniques, and data structures. The programming language utilized is the Java language. Topics covered in the course include, but are not limited to the following: basic data types, user defined data types, operator precedence, Boolean expressions, string and character manipulation, decision structures, repetition structures, the use of methods, and an introduction to classes. Additionally, students will study computer ethics, history, hardware, and the evolution of program design. This course is offered as a blended learning class consisting of primarily online instruction / interaction (through Haiku Learning) combined with some required traditional class time. Most programming projects will be turned in via Haiku Learning Drop Box. Traditional class time will consist of: 1) full class meetings with the instructor (no more than once per week), 2) at most 4 test dates (2 per quarter), 3) a scheduled final exam. Some class instruction will be done through electronic delivery: Google Hangouts, Skype, FaceTime, as determined by the instructor. Students should plan on a minimum of three class hours per week working on programming project assignments and another two class hours of topic study (a 5 hour class week). A computer is not required at home, though it will help make it easier to meet deadlines for projects (the software we use is free). Computers will be available on the St. Johns campus for student’s use at various times (library and at least two other room locations).

COMPUTER PROGRAMMING 2 (708)

BLENDED COURSE (ONLINE AND SOME TRADITIONAL CLASS) GRADES 9-12, 1 SEMESTER, ½ CREDIT, ELECTIVE, PREREQUISITE: COMPUTER PROGRAMMING 1

Computer Programming 2 is a one-semester course designed as a follow-up to Computer Programming 1. The programming language utilized is the Java language. Topics covered in the course include, but are not limited to the following: file input and output, the use of classes in program design, advanced data structures (multi-dimensional arrays, linked lists, stacks), and searching and sorting techniques. The course is design-based and laboratory centered with an emphasis on the development of successful algorithms in the solution to various problems. See description of Computer Programming 1 for details regarding blended format of this course.

AP COMPUTER SCIENCE A (702)

GRADES 11-12, 1 CREDIT, ADVANCED PLACEMENT, ELECTIVE. PREREQUISITE: DEPARTMENT RECOMMENDATION REQUIRED AND A GRADE OF B IN COMPUTER PROGRAMMING 2

The Advanced Placement Computer Science A course is a one-year course designed to provide students with an understanding of the basic concepts covered in a computer science first-semester course at the college level. These concepts include but are not limited to the following: basic data types, user defined data structures, string manipulation, decision making structures, repetition structures, the use of methods and classes, and program design involving classes. Additionally, students will study computer history, basic computer hardware concepts, development of algorithms in problem solving, and the use and abstraction of various data structures utilized in computer programming. These concepts are applicable to any high level programming language even though the language utilized within the course is Java. The course is design and laboratory based with an emphasis on the development of successful algorithms in the solution to various problems. Students are introduced to “real world” concepts through discussion and work with the Advanced Placement Case Study. Upon completion of the course, students will be prepared to take the Advanced Placement Computer Science A exam offered by the College Board, which can lead to the granting of college-level credit by many colleges and universities.

English

In keeping with St. Johns’ educational objectives, the English Department seeks to broaden human sensibilities and to refine sensitivity to language and to build inferential thinking skills.

A student must attain at least a C- final average in order to enter the next level of English. While Honors and Advanced Placement courses classes demand more than the regular classes in terms of depth, expanse, and complexity of coverage, it should be noted that all levels and courses emphasize writing opportunities in a variety of forms.

ENGLISH 6 (001)

GRADE 6

English 6 places emphasis on proper grammar and mechanics with an in-depth analysis of all parts of speech, sentence construction, punctuation, and common usage errors. Opportunities to demonstrate proper grammar will be given in cross-curricular writing assignments. Vocabulary coverage is incorporated in the literature studied throughout the year and also explores the origins, roots, prefixes, suffixes, and context clues to further enhance the student’s understanding of language.

READING 6 (003)

GRADE 6

Students will use a variety of materials in an intensive, individualized reading laboratory that will enable them to understand all the strategies important for reading comprehension. The focus will be on finding main ideas and supporting details, reading critically, inferential reading strategies, and adjusting the reading rate to fit the type and purpose of the reading passage. We will study two novels, numerous short stories, and one summer reading book and will incorporate vocabulary from the readings. Composition skills will be taught in conjunction with the readings.

HONORS READING 6 (004)

GRADE 6 - PREREQUISITE: B IN ADVANCED READING 5 OR AN A IN READING 5

Advanced reading moves at a faster pace and covers more material with greater depth. Students will use a variety of materials in an intensive, individualized reading laboratory that will enable them to understand all the strategies important for reading comprehension. The focus will be on finding main ideas and supporting details, reading critically, inferential reading strategies, and adjusting the reading rate to fit the type and purpose of the reading passage. We will study two novels, numerous short stories, and two summer reading books and will incorporate vocabulary from the readings. Composition skills will be taught in conjunction with the readings.

ENGLISH 7 (010)

GRADE 7

Beginning with a comprehensive review of basic grammar skills, students will then apply these skills through numerous writing experiences. Literature coverage emphasizes critical thinking skills and literary styles and applies this knowledge to composition topics. Vocabulary coverage is incorporated in the literature studied throughout the year and also explores the origins, roots, prefixes, suffixes, and context clues to further enhance the student’s understanding of language.

HONORS ENGLISH 7 (011)

GRADE 7 – PREREQUISITE: A IN ENGLISH 6 AND IN READING 6

Application and extension of grammar, usage, and mechanics learned in the previous year are emphasized in the students’ composition development. Writing endeavors include responses to assignments in literary readings, creative writing, the three-paragraph essay, and rhetorical modes of personal, descriptive, narrative, expository, and persuasive writing. Literature exposure includes novels, short stories, poetry, and drama. Vocabulary coverage is incorporated in the literature studied throughout the year and also explores the origins, roots, prefixes, suffixes, and context clues to further enhance the students’ understanding of language.

ENGLISH 8 (020)

GRADE 8

English 8 reviews the fundamentals of grammar, usage, sentence mechanics, paragraph writing, and the longer essay. The literature reviews narrative elements and literary techniques that give insight into interpretations of characters and outcomes and provides an opportunity for inferential thinking. Writing endeavors include responses to assignments in literary readings, creative writing, the three-paragraph essay, and rhetorical modes of personal, descriptive, narrative, expository, and persuasive writing. Literature exposure includes novels, short stories, poetry, and drama.Vocabulary coverage is incorporated in the literature studied throughout the year and also explores the origins, roots, prefixes, suffixes, and context clues to further enhance the student’s understanding of language.

HONORS ENGLISH 8 (021)

GRADE 8 – PREREQUISITE: B IN HONORS ENGLISH 7 OR AN A IN ENGLISH 7

Reviewing grammar and usage fundamentals, Honors English 8 continues to refine sentence structure with varied paragraph compositions and full length essays. Literature coverage focuses on identifying narrative elements and basic dramatic and poetic devices. Discussion and writing provide an opportunity for inferential thinking and analysis. Vocabulary coverage is incorporated in the literature studied throughout the year and also explores the origins, roots, prefixes, suffixes, and context clues to further enhance the students’ understanding of language.

ENGLISH 9 (030)

GRADE 9, 1 CREDIT

This college preparatory class enhances the fundamentals of critical thinking, reading, and writing. Students learn techniques for writing powerful sentences, paragraphs, essays, and the research paper. Students will integrate these skills into their own compositions. Readings will include a variety of genres and will be used as a basis for interpretive writing. Vocabulary study is also an important component of the class.

HONORS ENGLISH 9 (031)

GRADE 9, 1 CREDIT, HONORS. PREREQUISITE: B IN HONORS ENGLISH 8 OR AN A IN ENGLISH 8

The honors curriculum covers the same course of study as the Regular English 9 class except with more depth and at a more accelerated pace. Additional reading and writing assignments will be expected.

ENGLISH 10 (040)

GRADE 10, 1 CREDIT

This college preparatory course begins with a brief review of standard paragraph and essay structures and types. Students write literary essays which interpret works from the canon of world literature, advancing to research compositions and a term paper. Students examine the development of world literature from the late Middle Ages to the present, with an emphasis on relating literary tools and rhetorical devices to accurate interpretations. A solid understanding of the principles of grammar is expected of all students. Vocabulary study is incorporated in the literature read throughout the year.

HONORS ENGLISH 10 (041)

GRADE 10, 1 CREDIT, HONORS. PREREQUISITE: B IN HONORS ENGLISH 9 OR AN A IN ENGLISH 9

The honors curriculum covers the same course of study as the Regular English 10 class except with more depth and at an accelerated pace. Additional reading and writing assignments are expected. ENGLISH 11 (050) Grade 11, 1 Credit English 11 continues to build student awareness and college preparatory skills in four general areas: reading, writing, vocabulary, and test taking. Reading and writing assignments focus on the analysis of American writers. Research papers parallel and promote assignments in United States History classes.

HONORS ENGLISH 11 (051)

GRADE 11, 1 CREDIT, HONORS. PREREQUISITE: B IN HONORS ENGLISH 10 OR AN A IN ENGLISH 10

The honors curriculum covers the same course of study as the Regular English 11 class except with more depth and at an accelerated pace. Additional reading and writing assignments will be expected.

AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION (052)

GRADE 11, 1 CREDIT, ADVANCED PLACEMENT. PREREQUISITE: DEPARTMENT RECOMMENDATION AND B IN HONORS ENGLISH 10

As mandated by the College Board, the course “engages students in becoming skilled readers of prose written in a variety of periods, disciplines, and rhetorical contexts, and in becoming skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes. Both their writing and their reading should make students aware of the interactions among a writer’s purposes, audience expectations, and subjects, as well as the way generic conventions and the resources of language contribute to effectiveness in writing.” Students are expected to move away from the programmatic responses of the traditional five paragraph essay.

ENGLISH 12 (060)

GRADE 12, 1 CREDIT

English 12 students emulate all four types of prose and evaluate the contribution of numerous narrative and poetic techniques. Differing and multiple interpretations of varied works from personal and critics’ perspective serve as a governing rationale for much of the literature experience. Students read model essays that follow common patterns of organizational which serve as strategies for the development of ideas in their own compositions. Students write a comprehensive research paper as preparation for their college-level composition classes. Students participate in a collaborative ethics/English group symposium, which includes writing a research-based paper.

HONORS ENGLISH 12 (061)

GRADE 12, 1 CREDIT, HONORS. PREREQUISITE: B IN HONORS ENGLISH 11 OR A B IN AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION OR AN A IN ENGLISH 11

The honors curriculum covers the same course of study as the Regular English 12 class except with more depth and at an accelerated pace. Additional reading and writing assignments will be expected, including in-class synthesizing essays, in-depth analyses of literary criticism, and elements of argument.

AP LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION (062)

GRADE 12, 1 CREDIT, ADVANCED PLACEMENT. PREREQUISITE: DEPARTMENT RECOMMENDATION AND AN A IN HONORS ENGLISH 11 OR A B IN AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION

The AP English Literature and Composition course is designed to engage students in the careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative fiction, non-fiction, drama, and poetry. Through the close reading of selected texts, students will deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure for their readers.

PUBLIC SPEAKING (071)

GRADES 9-12, 1 SEMESTER, ELECTIVE

This course is designed to develop a student’s ability to communicate effectively and confidently as a public speaker. It will incorporate many styles and types of public speaking and will utilize the student’s critical thinking ability while improving his/her listening and response skills. The student will be required to formulate, refine, and deliver a wide variety of short speeches on various topics and ideas. The course is also a study of the principles and methods of selected forms of public speaking for various purposes, audiences, and contexts.

JOURNALISM – CHALICE 1 (601)

GRADES 9-12, 1 CREDIT, ELECTIVE

This course produces the school's yearbook. It requires writing and proofreading articles, captions, and headlines. This course gives practical experience in photography, photo editing, and layout design. Students learn a brief history of journalism and journalistic ethics. This course may be taken for more than one year: Journalism 2 (602), Journalism 3 (603), Journalism 4 (604).

History & Social Studies

The Department of History and the Social Sciences offers exposure to and exploration of a broad spectrum of the human experience. Courses are designed at each grade level to be developmentally appropriate and sequentially relevant to students’ studies at St. Johns.

Recognizing that a significant number of our students take advantage of the opportunities to take Advanced Placement exams and that the skills required to succeed in those courses are the same needed to do well in college, the department has embraced the Vertical Team approach to curricular coordination and pedagogical innovation recommended by the College Board.

HISTORY 6 – WORLD GEOGRAPHY AND THE RISE OF CIVILIZATIONS (300)

GRADE 6

Using an exploration of world geography and ancient civilizations and cultures, students develop a wide range of social studies skills to prepare them for their future studies. Students learn that the earth’s climate and geography shape cultures and civilizations. Emphasis is also placed on study skills including outlining, note taking, and research.

U.S. HISTORY 7 (310)

GRADE 7

Chronologically, this course covers the time period from the founding of Jamestown through the Civil War. Thematically, emphasis is placed on the role of the environment and people in shaping our nation. This is supplemented throughout the course by investigation into the lives of notable American figures to aid students in identifying the “American Identity” that makes every citizen, and our nation, unique. A personal history project on the students’ family histories is the culminating endeavor.

U.S. HISTORY 8 (320)

GRADE 8

Chronologically, this course covers the time period from the end of the Civil War to the present day. Thematically, emphasis is placed on the role of the environment, technological advances, and foreign affairs in shaping our nation. Students are guided through the process of writing a research paper during the second semester of study.

WORLD HISTORY (330)

GRADE 9, 1 CREDIT

This course traces the story of mankind from pre-civilized cultures to the Middle Ages. The course is centered on the key historical themes of cultural diffusion, development of political ideas and institutions, comparative study of the art and music of representative cultures of the world’s major civilizations, and the origins, central ideas, and influence of major religious and philosophical traditions. Additionally, current events and how these current events can relate back to the study of world history is integrated throughout the year.

HONORS WORLD HISTORY (329)

GRADE 9, 1 CREDIT. PREREQUISTE: A IN U.S. HISTORY 8

The honors course covers the same units as the regular level course. Greater emphasis is placed on primary sources and effective writing. Additional readings and critical analysis assignments are also incorporated.

MODERN WORLD HISTORY (331)

GRADE 10, 1 CREDIT

Modern World History is a continuation of the two-year study begun in grade nine. The course begins with a study of the world during the 16th century then traces the course different civilizations took through the modern age to the present. The collaboration of history, music, and art specialists offers a multi-faceted view of the modern world and empowers students to think and view the history of the world thematically and critically. Students will learn how the mostly distinct world civilizations they studied in ninth grade became interconnected in the modern world through globalization. The power of ideas and the development of modern thought is another theme of the course. The changing structure of political power with the birth and rise of nationalism is another important theme. Finally, students will explore various forms of cultural expression as both a reflection of and inspiration for historical events.

HONORS MODERN WORLD HISTORY (332)

GRADE 10, 1 CREDIT, HONORS. PREREQUISITE: A IN WORLD HISTORY

The honors course covers the same units as the regular level course while putting greater emphasis on analyzing primary sources and effective, insightful writing. Additional reading is also incorporated.

UNITED STATES HISTORY (350)

GRADE 11, 1 CREDIT

This one-year survey course focuses on the themes of the evolving concept of liberty in U.S. history, and U.S. involvement in world affairs. Now developmentally ready to deal with the complexity of American history, students are challenged to think more critically about the events of the past and the present to determine meaning and articulate it in a coherent argument and narrative.

HONORS UNITED STATES HISTORY (351)

GRADE 11, 1 CREDIT, HONORS. PREREQUISITE: B IN HONORS MODERN WORLD HISTORY OR AN A OR BETTER IN MODERN WORLD HISTORY

This one-year survey course focuses on the themes of the evolving concept of liberty in U.S. history, and U.S. involvement in world affairs. Now developmentally ready to deal with the complexity of American history, students are challenged to think more critically about the events of the past and the present to determine meaning and articulate it in a coherent argument and narrative. For the more mature and motivated scholar, the honors course puts greater emphasis on historical craft, primary sources, historiography, and effective, insightful writing.

AP UNITED STATES HISTORY (352)

GRADE 11, 1 CREDIT, ADVANCED PLACEMENT, ELECTIVE. PREREQUISITE: B IN HONORS MODERN WORLD HISTORY AND DEPARTMENTAL RECOMMENDATION

A one-year survey course, AP United States History offers a replacement for the 11th grade United States History course for qualified students. It is expected that the students selected for this course have excellent grades in prior history courses, have studied World History and Modern World History, preferably in the Honors Section, and have strong English language skills. The aim is to provide able and motivated students a comprehensive, college-level course in United States History and preparation for the Advanced Placement exam in the spring. Intellectually curious, skeptical, and reflective students capable of dealing with ambiguity and willing to take intellectual risks are well suited for the rigor and challenges afforded by this course.

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT (360)

GRADE 12, 1 SEMESTER, ½ CREDIT. PREREQUISITE: SUCCESSFUL COMPLETION OF U.S. HISTORY

This is a one semester, required course for seniors designed to broaden their understanding of the nature and structure of our government. The course places emphasis on the practical necessity of training seniors to be responsible citizens/voters by including a political participation requirement in the course.

ETHICS (304)

GRADES 12, 1 SEMESTER, ½ CREDIT

Ethics, a required course, studies the foundations of ethics and morals, and to discover how they impact individual, community, and worldwide decisions. The focus of the course is to help students develop a mature, well-informed adult conscience in order to live more fully into his/her humanity.

ECONOMICS (390)

GRADES 12, 1 SEMESTER, ½ CREDIT, ELECTIVE

This course introduces students to the economic concepts and principles of the American free-enterprise system.

AP PSYCHOLOGY (392)

GRADE 12, 1 CREDIT,ADVANCED PLACEMENT, ELECTIVE. PREREQUISITE: A IN HONORS HISTORY 11 OR HONORS ENGLISH 11; B IN AP ENGLISH 11 OR AP US HISTORY

This course offers an introductory college-level course survey of the major topics in psychology and preparation for the Advanced Placement Examination in the spring.

RENAISSANCE ART (347)

GRADES 10-12, 1 SEMESTER, ½ CREDIT, ELECTIVE

This course is a light survey course of the art of the Renaissance. The course will emphasize the art of the Italian Renaissance and incorporate fun, hands-on projects and Renaissance cooking. This course does not fulfill the graduation arts requirement.

AP ART HISTORY (342)

GRADES 11-12, 1 CREDIT, ADVANCED PLACEMENT, ELECTIVE. PREREQUISITE: SUCCESSFUL COMPLETION OF MODERN WORLD HISTORY AND A GRADE OF B IN CURRENT HONORS ENGLISH CLASS OR A GRADE OF A IN CURRENT REGULAR ENGLISH CLASS.

AP Art History provides a college level exploration of world civilization as reflected in the visual arts – painting, sculpture, architecture, and photography. AP Art History also emphasizes how and why works of art function in context, considering issues like gender and patronage. This course does not fulfill the arts graduation requirement.

Mathematics

From the mathematics of bridge building and Pythagorean spirals to the rigors of AP Calculus and statistical inference, the mathematics course offerings and instructional approaches range from the traditional to the contemporary. An integrated sequence of courses, with honors sections for especially talented math students, teaches and systematically reviews concepts from fractions and decimals to Advanced Placement Calculus and computer-oriented statistics.

The integration of intensive computer investigation and graphing calculator explorations enables students to effectively and efficiently analyze practical applications.

A student must attain at least a C-final average in order to enter the next level of mathematics.

NOTE: Summer math courses are considered “regular” level courses for prerequisite requirements.


MATH 6 (100)

GRADE 6

Math 6 is a course designed to reinforce the computational skills taught in Lower School and to expose students to pre-algebra concepts. The emphasis is placed on fractions, decimals, measurement, ratio, proportion, percent, simple geometry, problem solving, and integers.

MATH 6 ENRICHED (102)

GRADE 6, PREREQUISITE: TEACHER RECOMMENDATION AND B+ IN MATH 5 ENRICHED OR A IN MATH 5

This course covers the same topics presented in Math 6 but in an enhanced fashion to cultivate a deeper understanding of the concepts. This course is designed for students that have displayed a very high level of proficiency in their previous math courses.

MATH 7 (107)

GRADE 7, PREREQUISITE: MATH 6

This course is a transition course between basis skill-oriented math and algebraic concepts and applications. Integrated activities will reinforce computation with algebraic and geometric elements. Problem solving remains in focus.

PRE-ALGEBRA B (122)

GRADE 7, PREREQUISITE: DEPARTMENT RECOMMENDATION AND B+ IN PRE-ALGEBRA A OR A IN MATH 6

PRE-ALGEBRA B (120)

GRADE 8, PREREQUISITE: PRE-ALGEBRA A

Pre-Algebra B continues reinforcement of previously acquired skills in Pre-Algebra A as well as offers an introduction to algebraic concepts. Application of these skills in problem solving through traditional and real life word problems and activities is a priority.

ALGEBRA 1 (130)

GRADES 8-10, 1 CREDIT. PREREQUISITE: PRE-ALGEBRA B

Algebra 1 is designed to reinforce the basic symbolic language of mathematics introduced in Pre-Algebra B. It develops the use of signed numbers, formulas, graphing both first and second-degree equations/inequalities and functions, factoring and operations with algebraic functions. Proficiency in the manipulative skills is stressed, and vocabulary and accurate use of properties are emphasized. Word problems comprise a significant portion of the curriculum. Note: Summer algebra courses are considered “regular” level courses for prerequisite requirements.

HONORS ALGEBRA 1 (131)

GRADES 8-9, 1 CREDIT, HONORS. PREREQUISITE: A IN PRE-ALGEBRA B

Honors Algebra 1 is a faster paced, more in-depth Algebra course. Students will be exposed to the more difficult problems for each concept, in manipulative skills as well as solving word problems. The course is designed for the mature student with a real talent for and love of mathematics who CAN invest additional time on a daily basis.

GEOMETRY (140)

GRADES 9-11, 1 CREDIT. PREREQUISITE: ALGEBRA 1

Geometry is a full year course designed to develop in students an understanding of the fundamental concepts of Euclidean plane geometry, logic, and their various professional applications. Examination and comparison of shapes in discriminating detail employs both concrete and abstract models with the use of technology. Logic and deductive thinking are challenged and formalized with the refinement of mathematical reasoning and development of sound mathematical proofs. Emphasizing the use of algebra, selected topics in trigonometry and solid geometry are also introduced. Note: Summer geometry courses are considered “regular” level courses for prerequisite requirements.

HONORS GEOMETRY (141)

GRADES 9-10, 1 CREDIT, HONORS. PREREQUISITE: B IN HONORS ALGEBRA 1 OR AN A IN ALGEBRA 1

Honors Geometry is a fast paced course that includes independent research and in-depth, hands-on investigations of applications of geometry in professional situations.

ALGEBRA 2 AND TRIGONOMETRY (150)

GRADES 10-12, 1 CREDIT. PREREQUISITES: ALGEBRA 1 AND GEOMETRY

Algebra 2 and Trigonometry is a full year course required of all students. Algebra 2 is designed to illustrate how the tools of advanced algebra are used in the real world. This illustration is accomplished through integration with geometry and statistics as well as applications from related disciplines.

HONORS ALGEBRA 2 AND TRIGONOMETRY (151)

GRADES 10-11, 1 CREDIT, HONORS. PREREQUISITE: B IN HONORS ALGEBRA 1 AND HONORS GEOMETRY OR AN A IN ALGEBRA 1 AND GEOMETRY

Honors Algebra 2 and Trigonometry is a fast paced course with a more in-depth investigation of advanced algebra topics. This course is designed for the motivated student who enjoys the challenge of the more difficult problems in each chapter.

ALGEBRA 3 AND TRIGONOMETRY (160)

GRADES 11-12, 1 CREDIT, ELECTIVE. PREREQUISITE: ALGEBRA 2 AND TRIGONOMETRY

Algebra 3 is the development of logical thinking, problem solving, and accuracy in completing the work. Extensive work is done on SAT review and applied math for life situations. An opportunity to take the CLEP test for college credit may be possible at the end of the second semester. This course is NOT the prerequisite course for AP Calculus. If you are planning to take AP Calculus you MUST enroll in Honors Pre-Calculus. This course is not available to a student that has completed or is currently enrolled in any of the following math courses: Honors Pre-Calculus, AP Calculus or AP Statistics.

DISCRETE MATHEMATICS (193)

GRADES 11-12, 1 SEMESTER, ½ CREDIT, ELECTIVE. PREREQUISITE: ALGEBRA 2 AND TRIGONOMETRY

Discrete Mathematics is designed around the concepts of problem solving, critical thinking, written communications, and oral communications.

PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS (190)

GRADES 11-12, 1 SEMESTER, ½ CREDIT, ELECTIVE. PREREQUISITE: ALGEBRA 2 AND TRIGONOMETRY

Probability and Statistics is designed to help students acquire the skills to manage, interpret, analyze, and criticize data.

HONORS PRE-CALCULUS (171)

GRADES 11-12, 1 CREDIT, HONORS, ELECTIVE. PREREQUISITE: B IN HONORS GEOMETRY AND HONORS ALGEBRA 2 OR AN A IN GEOMETRY AND ALGEBRA 2

Honors Pre-Calculus is a full year course designed to provide students with an in-depth review of advanced algebra topics, a full treatment of trigonometry and polar functions, and an introduction to calculus specific topics. This course is the prerequisite course to AP Calculus. If you are planning to take AP Calculus next year, you must be enrolled in this course.

AP CALCULUS AB (172)

GRADES 11-12, 1 CREDIT, ADVANCED PLACEMENT, ELECTIVE. PREREQUISITE: DEPARTMENT RECOMMENDATION REQUIRED AND A GRADE OF B IN HONORS PRE-CALCULUS

AP Calculus AB consists of a full year's work in calculus and related topics. It is a technology-enriched course that completes the entire College Board recommended syllabus for the Advanced Placement Calculus AB exam.

AP CALCULUS BC (182)

GRADE 12, 1 CREDIT, ADVANCED PLACEMENT. PREREQUISITE: B IN AP CALCULUS AB

AP Calculus BC consists of a full year's work in calculus and related topics. It includes all topics taught in AP Calculus AB plus additional topics. The content covered is designed to qualify the student for placement and credit in a course that is one course beyond that granted for AP Calculus AB. It is a technology-enriched course that completes the entire College Board recommended syllabus for the Advanced Placement Calculus BC exam.

AP STATISTICS (192)

GRADES 12, 1 CREDIT, ADVANCED PLACEMENT, ELECTIVE. PREREQUISITE: DEPARTMENT RECOMMENDATION AND AN A IN PREVIOUS REGULAR MATH CLASS OR A B IN PREVIOUS HONORS MATH CLASS

AP Statistics is a college level class designed to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. The topics are divided into four major themes: exploratory analysis, planning a study, probability, and statistical inference.

Science

The Science curriculum is designed to facilitate a learning environment that encourages students to realize their potential and prepare for higher learning. This is accomplished by encouraging curiosity, critical thinking, and appreciation of the value of science in relation to other disciplines. We strive to impart a well-rounded understanding of the biological and physical sciences and their relationship to the environment in which we live.

Our main priority is to develop a student who demonstrates proficiency in problem solving, laboratory techniques, and use of scientific equipment. There is an emphasis on hands-on experiences, lab exercises, integration of technology and field trips, when warranted. Our approach fosters high expectations, self-motivation, and success for every student.


SCIENCE 6 – LIFE SCIENCE (200)

GRADE 6

Life science is a full year course with hands-on exploration of living things. The curriculum covers cells, plants, birds, amphibians, reptiles, and mammals and integrates current science and health topics. The laboratory experiences include dissections, animal observations, DNA modeling, microscope use, and the creation of butterfly and vegetable gardens.

SCIENCE 7 – EARTH SCIENCE (210)

GRADE 7

Earth science is a full year study of earth and its place in space. The course includes the study of earth materials, earth’s internal processes, earth’s air and water, and earth in space. Laboratory experiences enhance learning by providing students with opportunities for inquiry learning, concrete examples of concepts, and opportunities for students to apply scientific methods in problem-solving activities.

SCIENCE 8 – PHYSICAL SCIENCE (220)

GRADE 8

Physical science is a full year course designed to provide students with a continuation and extension of their science experience in preparation for topic-specific courses that they will encounter at the high school level. Course work falls into two major areas of study: chemistry and physics. An end of the year grade of an A is required in this course to be considered for a recommendation to Honors Biology in 9th Grade. Mathematics as a tool of science is emphasized throughout.

BIOLOGY (230)

GRADE 9, 1 CREDIT

This course provides an overview of the living world. Students learn the basics of important biological molecules, cell structure and function, including photosynthesis, cellular respiration, cell division, genetics, and DNA. The biology of plants and body systems are also explored. Laboratory activities are important elements of this course.

HONORS BIOLOGY (231)

GRADE 9, 1 CREDIT, HONORS. PREREQUISITE: A IN SCIENCE 8

This course presents an in-depth version of regular biology with increased emphasis on molecular biology, development of science writing skills, laboratory skills and research projects.

CHEMISTRY (240)

GRADES 10-12, 1 CREDIT, PREREQUISITE: ALGEBRA 1 AND BIOLOGY

Chemistry is a lab-oriented, college preparatory course. Topics covered include atomic structure, chemical nomenclature, bonding, states of matter, thermochemistry, electrochemistry, equilibrium, acids/bases, and stoichiometry. This class meets six times per week.

HONORS CHEMISTRY (241)

GRADES 10-12, 1 CREDIT, HONORS. PREREQUISITE: HONORS ALGEBRA 2 CONCURRENTLY OR PREVIOUSLY AND A GRADE OF A IN BIOLOGY OR A B IN HONORS BIOLOGY.

In addition to the coursework for Chemistry, students will cover additional topics in the areas of reaction rates, oxidation-reduction reactions, organic chemistry, and nuclear chemistry. This class meets six periods per week.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (243)

GRADES 10-12, 1 CREDIT, ELECTIVE. PREREQUISITE: COMPLETION OF BIOLOGY

This course explores the relationships between human activities and the natural environment. Plants and animals are studied to examine their connections to each other in soil, water, and air. Conservation, preservation, recycling, and pollution issues are emphasized.

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY (291)

GRADES 10-12, 1 CREDIT, ELECTIVE. PREREQUISITE: COMPLETION OF BIOLOGY AND CHEMISTRY

This course provides an extensive study of the structure and function of the human body. All major organ systems are covered. This course is not open to students who have completed AP Biology.

PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING 1 (264)

GRADES 10-12, ½ CREDIT, ELECTIVE. PREREQUISITE: COMPLETION OF BIOLOGY AND GEOMETRY CONCURRENTLY OR PREVIOUSLY

Principles of Engineering 1 is an introductory course of engineering that focuses on civil and mechanical engineering. Developing skills to understand the concepts will be accomplished through activities and projects. Students will learn the engineering design process to incrementally solve a given problem with research, development, testing, and solution stages. The ultimate goal is to cultivate the analytical mind of future engineers.

PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING II (268)

GRADES 10-12, ½ CREDIT, ELECTIVE. PREREQUISITE: COMPLETION OF BIOLOGY AND GEOMETRY CONCURRENTLY OR PREVIOUSLY

Principles of Engineering 2 is an introductory course of engineering that focuses on electrical engineering and robotics. Developing skills to understand the concepts will be accomplished through activities and projects. Students will learn the engineering design process to incrementally solve a given problem with research, development, testing, and solution stages. The ultimate goal is to cultivate the analytical mind of future engineers.

PHYSICS (260)

GRADES 10-12, 1 CREDIT, ELECTIVE. PREREQUISITE: COMPLETION OF ALGEBRA 1 AND BIOLOGY. SUGGESTED COMPLETION OF CHEMISTRY AND ALGEBRA 2 OR GEOMETRY.

Physics develops a relationship between science and other disciplines. It emphasizes reading and analyzing word problems and uses mathematics as a tool in laboratory exercises. The course is taught assuming competency in Algebra 1 with some basic trigonometry concepts included. It covers topics in physics from Newtonian Mechanics to Thermodynamics, Optics, Electricity and Magnetism.

AP PHYSICS 1 (262)

(THIS COURSE REPLACES PREVIOUSLY OFFERED HONORS PHYSICS.) GRADE 11-12, 1 CREDIT, ADVANCED PLACEMENT, ELECTIVE. PREREQUISITE: COMPLETION OF ALGEBRA 2, COMPLETION OF HONORS CHEMISTRY WITH A B OR CHEMISTRY WITH AN A OR COMPLETION OF PHYSICS WITH AN A. DEPARTMENT RECOMMENDATION.

AP Physics 1 prepares the student for the Advanced Placement examination. This Algebra-based course studies Newtonian Mechanics in depth with concentrations on momentum, work energy principles, rotational motion, simple harmonic motion, mechanical waves, and touches on electric forces. Extensive laboratory work is required. This class meets six periods per week.

AP PHYSICS 2 (267)

GRADE 12, 1 CREDIT, ADVANCED PLACEMENT, ELECTIVE. PREREQUISITE: COMPLETION OF AP PHYSICS 1 WITH A B OR BETTER OR DEPARTMENT RECOMMENDATION.

AP Physics 2 prepares the student for the Advanced Placement examination. This Algebra-based course continues from AP Physics 1 and studies Thermodynamics, Electricity and Magnetism, Optics, and Modern Physics. Extensive laboratory work is required. This class meets six periods per week.

AP BIOLOGY (232)

GRADE 11-12, 1 CREDIT, ADVANCED PLACEMENT, ELECTIVE. PREREQUISITE: DEPARTMENT RECOMMENDATION, A STRONG INTEREST IN SCIENCE AND A GRADE OF A IN CHEMISTRY AND BIOLOGY; OR B IN HONORS BIOLOGY AND HONORS CHEMISTRY. SUCCESSFUL COMPLETION OF ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY IS STRONGLY RECOMMENDED.

This course is equivalent to a two-semester college introductory biology course. Completion of this course prepares the student for the Advanced Placement Examination. The curriculum provides a wide-ranging background into biochemistry, cells, genetics, evolution, animals, plants, and ecology. This course is presented with an emphasis on advanced inquiry, reasoning skills, and connecting concepts across domains. Extensive laboratory work is required. This class meets seven periods per week.

World Language

St. Johns requires for graduation the successful completion of three levels of one world language or two levels of two world languages. A student must attain at least a C- final average in order to enter the next level of a language. Students are encouraged to pursue language study beyond the required and to study more than one world language.


MIDDLE SCHOOL WORLD LANGUAGES

GRADE 7 WORLD LANGUAGE (400) GRADE 7, 1 CREDIT

This unique world language class for students in Grade 7 consists of one semester each of both French and Spanish. Each language focuses on basic structures, vocabulary, culture, and interdisciplinary studies. The purpose of this course is to prepare the student to choose a language to study to meet the graduation requirement.


FRENCH 1 (402)

GRADES 8, 1 CREDIT; FOR THE BEGINNING FRENCH STUDENT

The skills of listening, speaking, reading, writing and appreciating culture are introduced. Mastery of basic vocabulary and structures including the present and past tenses prepares students for the increasingly challenging concepts of Level 2 and beyond.


SPANISH 1 (427)

GRADE 8, 1 CREDIT; FOR THE BEGINNING SPANISH STUDENT

The skills of listening, speaking, reading, writing, and appreciating culture are introduced. Mastery of basic vocabulary and structures including the present and past tenses prepares students for the increasingly challenging concepts of Level 2 and beyond. Spanish culture and fine arts are interwoven throughout the course.


UPPER SCHOOL WORLD LANGUAGES


FRENCH 1

(405) GRADES 9-12, 1 CREDIT; FOR THE BEGINNING FRENCH STUDENT

The skills of listening, speaking, reading, writing and appreciating culture are introduced. Mastery of basic vocabulary and structures including the present and past tenses prepares students for the increasingly challenging concepts of Level 2 and beyond.


FRENCH 2 (408)

GRADES 9-12, 1 CREDIT

This course continues and expands the vocabulary and structures begun at the first year level and features the study of the regions of France as well as French speaking nations of the world. Structures presented include the imperfect and future tenses, as well as the use of object, relative and interrogative pronouns.


HONORS FRENCH 2 (409)

GRADES 9-12, 1 CREDIT, HONORS. PREREQUISITE: AN A IN FRENCH 1 OR FRENCH 1B

In addition to the course content of French 2, Honors students complete readings, exercises and assessments that are more rigorous than those of the regular French 2 class.


FRENCH 3 (410)

GRADES 10-12, 1 CREDIT

This continuation of French develops and strengthens the skills learned in French 1 and 2 and emphasizes frequent compositions to develop facility with the compound tenses of French. Cultural topics are expanded to include French cinema, history and literature of the French speaking world.


HONORS FRENCH 3 (411)

GRADES 10-12, 1 CREDIT, HONORS. PREREQUISITE: B IN HONORS FRENCH 2, OR AN A IN FRENCH 2

In addition to the course content of French 3, Honors students complete readings, exercises and assessments that are more rigorous than those of the regular French 3 class.


HONORS FRENCH 4 (412)

GRADES 10-12, 1 CREDIT, HONORS. PREREQUISITE: B IN HONORS FRENCH 3, OR AN A IN FRENCH 3

The intricacies of composition are stressed, as well as the oral use of the target language. The small group make-up of the class allows each student ample opportunity to use all language skills on a daily basis. Active participation promotes the student's progress toward fluency. Students are encouraged to sit for the CLEP exam at the end of the year.


AP FRENCH LANGUAGE (419)

GRADES 11-12, 1 CREDIT, ADVANCED PLACEMENT. PREREQUISITE: DEPARTMENT RECOMMENDATION REQUIRED AND A GRADE OF B IN HONORS FRENCH 4

Modern French culture, literature, worldwide events and other topics of student interest provide the substance of study which culminates in preparation for the Advanced Placement French Language examination. Refined skills of conversation and composition, including the ability to express oneself accurately and fluently without dependence on a dictionary are essential elements of this advanced course.


LATIN 1 (454)

GRADES 9-12, 1 CREDIT; FOR THE BEGINNING LATIN STUDENT

An early emphasis on reading and vocabulary prepares students for sustained reading in more advanced classes. Elementary writing is introduced to reinforce and assess grammatical concepts. Conversational skills, while introduced, are not stressed. Students learn all tenses of the active voice and all cases except locative for the first three declensions. This course lays the foundation in grammar and vocabulary for all later classes. Students will also explore cultural topics such as Roman daily life, mythology, classical art, history, and the Romans’ influence on modern America.


LATIN 2 (456)

GRADES 9-12, 1 CREDIT

This course builds upon those words and structures learned in the first year. Students begin their study of the subjunctive mood, indirect discourse, the passive voice, and ablative absolute while expanding their understanding of syntax. The last two declensions of nouns are mastered. Cultural units include the The Iliad and The Odyssey in mythology as well as history of the Roman Republic and Empire. Students will continue to explore cultural topics such as Roman daily life, mythology, classical art, history, and the Romans’ influence on modern America.


HONORS LATIN 2 (457)

GRADES 9-12, 1 CREDIT, HONORS. PREREQUISITE: AN A IN LATIN 1

Honors students master additional cultural material, advance more quickly through the grammatical material, and are required to master a larger vocabulary than students in standard Latin 2.


LATIN 3 (463)

GRADES 9-12, 1 CREDIT

Latin 3 completes the overview of Latin grammar with focus on uses of the dependent and independent subjunctive and deponent verbs. Students will read selections from various Latin authors as presented in the Unit 4 textbook and learn to scan dactylic hexameter. In addition, figures of speech and rhetoric will be introduced. Students graduate from reading textbook Latin to the study of ancient authors. The authors vary from year to year, but generally include excerpts from Ovid, Caesar, Cicero, Vergil, and Martial. Cultural topics emphasize Roman literature and the Romans’ influence on modern America.


HONORS LATIN 3 (458)

GRADES 9-12, 1 CREDIT, HONORS. PREREQUISITE: B IN HONORS LATIN 2 OR A OR BETTER IN LATIN 2

In addition to the course content of Latin 3, Honors students complete readings and assessments that are more rigorous than those of the regular Latin 3 class.


AP LATIN (462)

GRADES 11-12, 1 CREDIT, ADVANCED PLACEMENT. PREREQUISITE: DEPARTMENT RECOMMENDATION REQUIRED AND A GRADE OF B IN HONORS LATIN 3

Students study the Aenid of Vergil and The Gallic Wars of Caesar in both Latin and English. The entire work in both cases is read in English and those selections in Latin which are dictated by the syllabus of the Advanced Placement Examination. Students learn to write critical essays in English about Latin literature and to cite ancient authors correctly. The study of figures of speech and rhetoric is an important part of this course. The ability to write well in English as well as the ability to read Latin at sight is essential for this advanced course.


SPANISH 1 (429)

GRADE 9-12, 1 CREDIT; FOR THE BEGINNING SPANISH STUDENT

The skills of listening, speaking, reading, writing, and appreciating culture are introduced. Mastery of basic vocabulary and structures including the present and past tenses prepares students for the increasingly challenging concepts of Level 2 and beyond. Spanish culture and fine arts are interwoven throughout the course.


SPANISH 2 (431)

GRADES 9-12, 1 CREDIT

This course continues and expands the vocabulary and structures begun at the first year level and features the study of the regions of Spain as well as other Spanish speaking nations of the world. Structures presented include the preterite, imperfect, future, progressive, subjunctive and conditional tenses, as well as the use of object pronouns, the passive voice, interrogative pronouns and command forms. Emphasis is placed on listening and speaking in Spanish. The study of Spanish culture and fine arts is continued on a more advanced level.


HONORS SPANISH 2 (432)

GRADES 9-12, 1 CREDIT, HONORS. PREREQUISITE: AN A IN SPANISH 1B OR SPANISH 1

In addition to the course content of Spanish 2, Honors students complete readings, exercises, and investigative assignments that are more rigorous than those of the Spanish 2 class.


SPANISH 3 (433)

GRADES 9-12, 1 CREDIT

This continuation of Spanish develops and strengthens the skills learned in Spanish 1 and 2 and emphasizes advanced grammar topics – the subjunctive vs. the indicative and the preterite vs. the imperfect. Students write frequent dialogs and compositions to fine-tune their conversational and communicative skills. Cultural topics are expanded to include Latin American history, politics, and current events.


HONORS SPANISH 3 (434)

GRADES 9-12, 1 CREDIT, HONORS. PREREQUISITE: B IN HONORS SPANISH 2 OR AN A IN SPANISH 2

In addition to the course content of Spanish 3, Honors students complete readings, exercises and assessments that are more rigorous than those of the regular Spanish 3 class.


HONORS SPANISH 4 (435)

GRADES 9-12, 1 CREDIT, HONORS. PREREQUISITE: B OR BETTER IN HONORS SPANISH 3, OR A OR BETTER IN SPANISH 3

The fourth year of Spanish emphasizes the application of skills on the advanced level. Through the reading of short stories, poems, and plays, students have the opportunity to combine the use of the Spanish language with the history and culture of its people. The intricacies of composition are stressed, as well as the oral use of the target language. The small group make-up of the class allows each student ample opportunity to use all language skills on a daily basis. Active participation promotes the student's progress toward fluency. Students are encouraged to sit for the CLEP exam at the end of the year.


AP SPANISH LANGUAGE (436)

GRADE 12, 1 CREDIT, ADVANCED PLACEMENT. PREREQUISITE: DEPARTMENT RECOMMENDATION REQUIRED AND A GRADE OF B OR BETTER IN HONORS SPANISH 4

Modern Hispanic culture, literature, worldwide events and other topics of student interest provide the substance of study which culminates in preparation for the Advanced Placement Spanish Language Examination. Refined skills of conversation and composition, including the ability to express oneself accurately and fluently without dependence on a dictionary are essential elements of this advanced course.

Performing Arts

DANCE (511)

Grades 6-12, 1 Credit, Elective

This course is an introduction to and development of ballet, modern, and jazz skills for developing contemporary dance. It encompasses many styles of music, improvisation, choreography, dance history, writing, awareness of the body, and movement. The class is ideal for the beginning dancer and athlete, but is also beneficial for more experienced dancers. Appropriate dance attire is expected, but special concessions can be made with the permission of the teacher. Dance may be taken more than one year. Dance 2 (512), Dance 3 (513), Dance 4 (514)

DRAMA 6&7 (576)

Grades 6-7, 1 Credit, Elective

This drama course offers students an opportunity to continue scene study, improvisation, and participation in a class production at the end of the semester. Students engage in the rehearsal process, learning lines, blocking and refining a scene.

MIDDLE SCHOOL CHORUS (594)

Grades 6-8, 1 Credit, Elective

Middle School Chorus is a performance based group, and is open to students in grades six through eight. Students learn vocal technique, music theory, and sight-reading skills. The group performs a variety of choral styles at school events and in the community. Students will have the opportunity to audition for the Florida All-State Choruses and participate in the events of the Florida Vocal Association and American Association of Choral Directors. Students will be given a calendar with all required performance dates at the beginning of the school year.

HAND BELLS (541)

Grades 6-12, 1 Credit, Elective

The Hand Bell Choir is a performance based group. Students gain knowledge of playing techniques, music reading skills, and varying musical styles. The group performs for school functions and represents St. Johns in the community.

CONCERT BAND (546)

Grades 6-7, 1 Credit, Elective

Concert Band is a performance-based class. Students will be required to attend and participate in several performances outside of regular school hours. Members include only those who have participated in a band class for at least one year. Placement is based on student audition. Instruments include woodwind and brass only.

SYMPHONIC BAND (548)

Grades 8-12, 1 Credit, Elective

Symphonic Band is a performance-based class. Students are required to attend and participate in several performances outside of regular school hours. Members include only those who have participated in a band class for at least one year. Placement is based on student audition. Instruments include woodwind and brass only.

PERCUSSION (560)

Grades 6-12, 1 Credit, Elective

Percussion is a performance-based class. Members include only those who have participated within a band and/or percussion class for at least one year. Participants will perform a variety of music including solo work, small ensemble music and concert band literature. The percussion class will work in conjunction with other performing arts classes. Students will be required to attend band rehearsals held outside regular school hours.

ST. JOHNS SINGERS 1 (550)

Grades 9-12, 1 Credit, Elective

Teacher selection based on a vocal audition and musicianship required St. Johns Singers is a performance-based choral group. A vocal audition to determine vocal placement is required. The group meets at 7:10 a.m. St. Johns Singers offers a comprehensive education in vocal technique, musicianship skills and music theory. The group performs a variety of choral styles ranging from Renaissance madrigals to contemporary literature. Singers perform for school events and in the community. Students have opportunities to audition for the Florida All-State Choruses, and the Florida Choral Directors Honor Choirs. The group participates in events of the Florida Vocal Association. The group also enjoys travel and performance opportunities in the United States and in Europe. Singers may be taken for more than one year: Singers 2 (553), Singers 3 (555), Singers 4 (557)

THEATRE (592)

Grades 8-12, 1 Credit, Elective

Theatre is a course designed to expose, train and prepare students for the world of theatre. This course introduces students to theatre history, acting styles and techniques, technical production components, and movement/dance to enable the student to better understand theatre in its totality. All aspects of the class will enable the student to prepare and present an involved critique of a production and/or a small but formal production. The student will be given many opportunities to practice the skills learned in this class through school productions and Drama Club. This class can be taken for more than one year and is designed to deepen the student’s understanding of the elements of theatre. Theatre 2 (588).

INTRODUCTION TO MUSIC THEORY (536)

Grades 9-12, 1 Semester, ½ Credit, Elective

This one-semester course, offered each fall, introduces the fundamentals of reading and writing music, ear training, and sight singing. Study includes pitch and rhythmic notation, terminology, scales and key signatures, harmonic structure, form, and basic keyboard skills. Knowledge gained in this class will prepare interested students for the AP Music Theory course.

AP MUSIC THEORY (542)

Grades 11-12, 1 Credit, Advanced Placement, Elective. Prerequisite: Departmental recommendation

The ultimate goal of this course is to develop the student’s ability to recognize, understand, and describe the basic materials and processes of music that are heard or presented in a score. The achievement of these goals will be approached by addressing fundamental aural, analytical, and compositional skills using both listening and writing exercises. This course will progress to include more creative tasks, such as the harmonization of a melody by selecting appropriate chords, the composition of a musical bass line to provide two-voice counterpoint, or the realization of figured-bass notation. In order to participate in this class, the student must be able to read and write musical notation, as well as have previous performance experience in a music performance class.

Visual Arts

ART 6 (507)

Grade 6, 1 Credit, Elective

This course covers two-dimensional and three-dimensional concept and emphasizes the basic language of the principles and elements of design. The goal of this class is to allow students to explore art media, techniques, and develop artistic confidence. For two-dimensional art projects, students will develop skill in the areas of painting, drawing, and printmaking. Students will gain experience with the following media: graphite, ink, watercolor, tempera, and collage. For three-dimensional art projects, students will develop skills in the areas of additive sculpture and ceramics. Self-assessment critiques will be conducted at the conclusion of major projects and students will learn how to critique and assess art. Students will study art vocabulary and historical references and will be required to maintain a sketchbook.

ART 7 (506)

Grades 7, 1 Credit, Elective

This course covers two-dimensional and three-dimensional concept and emphasizes the basic language of the principles and elements of design. The goal of this class is to create artistically confident students and broaden their understanding of how classroom projects and techniques fit within an art historical context. Exploration, problem solving, and critical thinking will be fostered. For two-dimensional art projects, students will develop skill in the areas of painting, drawing, and printmaking. Students will gain experience with the following media: charcoal, graphite, ink, watercolor, tempera, and collage. For three-dimensional art projects, students will study additive sculptural methods in order to become familiar with utilitarian and sculptural considerations. Self-assessment critiques and teacher guided class critiques will be conducted at the conclusion of major projects. Students will study art vocabulary and historical references and will be required to maintain a sketchbook.

ART 8 (509)

Grades 8, 1 Credit, Elective

This course will cover two-dimensional and three-dimensional concepts and emphasizes the basic language of the principles and elements of design. The goal of this class is to create artistically confident students. Exploration, problem solving, and critical thinking will be fostered. Students will broaden their understanding and gain perspective of how classroom projects and techniques fit within an art historical context. The study of art vocabulary and historical references is a required component of this course. Two-dimensional art projects will include painting, drawing, and printmaking. Students will gain experience with the following media: charcoal, graphite, ink, watercolor, tempera, and collage. Three-dimensional art projects will include both additive and subtractive methods. Sculptural methods that will be covered include wire construction and ceramic techniques such as slab and coil construction. Students should feel comfortable assessing art and using foundation vocabulary for teacher guided class critiques and self-assessment rubrics. A sketchbook is required for both in class and homework assignments.

Foundations of Art (2D/3D) (516)

Grades 9-12, 1 Credit, Elective

Foundations of Art (2D/3D) is intended to serve as the foundation for all other visual arts studio courses. Students will be introduced to ideas in two-dimensional design and three-dimensional design, including composition, space, color, form, theoretical perspective, art vocabulary, techniques, processes, materials, tools and the methodology of visual creativity. The major objectives for this course are to learn and understand the elements and principles of design, to use them individually and in combinations in a variety of media and formats, to research contemporary and historical artists and designers, and to better understand the context of the art and design field. Students will develop an artistic vocabulary and learn to participate in group and individual critiques. Students will be required to work proficiently in their sketchbooks and develop their ideas through course-related research.

Ceramic and Sculpture Design (3D studio) (501)

Grades 10-12, 1 Credit, Elective. Prerequisite: Completion of Foundations of Art

3/D Studio will begin with further exploration of concepts and processes introduced in the 2D/3D foundations course. Students will gain experience with a diverse selection of 3/D processes including addition (construction or fabrication), subtraction (carving), and manipulation (modeling). Students will also be exposed to innovative methods such as working with found objects, kinetics, as well as different approaches to the medium of clay. Students will investigate hand building and wheel throwing techniques for in the creation of functional and nonfunctional crafted forms. Contemporary issues related to 3/D concepts will be explored through assigned readings, personal research, class discussion, critiques and individual projects. Students will be required to work proficiently in their sketchbooks and develop their ideas through course-related research.

Survey of Ceramics (502)

Grades 11-12, 1 Semester, ½ Credit, Elective. Prerequisite: Completion of Foundations of Art or any semester (1/2 credit) visual arts course

Survey of Ceramics will be focused on giving beginning students an introductory experience with the art and technical aspects of ceramics. Students will have an opportunity to create both utilitarian and sculptural objects while investigating techniques in hand-building, modeling and manipulation. Students will be introduced to the history of the medium and its current contemporary practices through readings, Haiku page course work and library research.

Drawing and Painting Studio (522)

Grades 10-12, 1 Credit, Elective. Prerequisite: Completion of Foundations of Art

The drawing and painting studio course will begin with further exploration of concepts and processes introduced in the 2D/3D Foundations course and will develop students' basic drawing and painting skills and introduce various drawing and painting media and techniques. Experiences will involve the expanded use and/or combinations of line, value, form, texture, shadow, reflection, ellipse, the face, natural subjects, atmospheric perspective, and still life. Different artistic genres, examination of color, and rendering will be investigated. Contemporary issues related to 2/D concepts will be explored through assigned readings, personal research, class discussion, critiques and individual projects. Students will be required to work proficiently in their sketchbooks and develop their ideas through course-related research.

Portfolio Development Studio (526)

Grades 10-12, 1 Credit, Elective. Prerequisite: Completion of Foundations of Art

In the portfolio development studio, work and research will be geared toward straightforward and innovative art making strategies. Students will explore expressive visual qualities, dynamic composition, and color theory. Students will also develop 3/D artworks that demonstrate craftsmanship and developed design. The visual art portfolio is a meaningful indicator of artistic commitment, ability, and potential. A student’s artwork reflects their visual sensitivity, intellectual curiosity and creativity, their motivation and self-discipline, and their previous experience in the visual arts. Students taking this course will develop portfolios that incorporate meaningful themes and contexts for growing visual literacy. Students will develop quality artworks that demonstrate strong visual idea development, significant knowledge of the elements and principles of design, and the artistic skill and ability necessary to apply them. Students will be required to work proficiently in their sketchbooks and develop their ideas through course-related research. This course will require an additional lab once a week.

Physical Education

AP Course Offerings

AP Spanish
AP Latin
AP French
AP Biology
AP Chemistry
AP Physics 1
AP Physics 2
AP Environmental Science
AP Calculus AB
AP Calculus BC
AP Statistics
AP US History
AP Psychology
AP Seminar
AP Portfolio Development Studio
AP Music Theory
AP English Language and Composition
AP English Literature
AP Computer Principles
AP Computer Science A

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